1,000,001 Opportunities: Every Story Is a Tech Story

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If every company is a technology company and every business will be digital, does that mean that every story could be a “technology” story? Nilay Patel at The Verge certainly thinks so. And as Ricardo Bilton at Digiday explains, there are very interesting shifts taking place in the technology publishing world.

Stepping back, the bold claims about every company and business come from the experts over at Gartner. At their last two symposiums, the Gartner team have painstakingly detailed how technology should now be a key part of every company’s DNA. And it’s hard to argue against that as technology continues to transform the way we live.

If technology is now either part of, or soon to be part of, absolutely everything, then wrapping a neat bow around “technology stories” and placing them in an individual “technology section” could be an increasingly futile exercise for publishers. Sure, there still needs to be coverage of the actual technologies themselves (the speeds, the feeds and all the stuff geeks like us love), but more and more, the bigger and more impactful stories about what technology can actually do live within areas that you might not initially expect. Unless of course you already have Vanity Fair, Backchannel and Refinery29 on your list of targets for enterprise tech stories.

From a technology storytelling standpoint, this is kind of cool. It challenges us to rethink how we tell stories so that they can be understood by people who don’t understand, or don’t really want to understand, how technology actually works – and these simple, digestible stories often resonate the best with readers. With major technology publishers continuing to face tough times, taking a broader approach that focuses on the human and cultural aspects of technology opens up many more opportunities for hacks and flacks.

To mix things up further on the PR side, the way we actually tell said stories also needs new forms of content. A recent study of 500 top publishers by Frac.tl. showed the challenge of being heard, with writers at sites like nytimes.com, TheGuardian.com and CNN.com saying they receive about 26,000 emails a year from people trying to get press coverage. The study was also another PR blow for the press release, with only 7 percent of digital publishers asking for more. By contrast, the most requested items were articles (19 percent), infographics (12 percent) and mix-media pieces (13 percent). And forget stalking people down on the phone (only 5 percent want you to call) and those lengthy pitches – 45 percent of writers want them to be fewer than 100 words. Or to put it another way, you have fewer words than I used in the last four sentences to get your story across.

So opportunities abound, but they are not on a silver plate and they do require a rethink. Which is exactly what we are doing everyday at Blanc & Otus. It’s fun. It keeps things different. And we wouldn’t have it any other way.